Integrated Science Program

List of Faculty Members,Integrated Science Program
  • Mathematics and Physics
  • Information Sciences
  • Chemistry
  • Biological Sciences

Department of Mathematics and Physics

Hiroshi Ito

Position Professor
Research
Description
While integers are somewhat familiar, if you study them more in depth, you might suddenly find yourself helpless and stupefied by this fascinating subject.
Nowadays, part of its properties are being used in fields and theories like cryptology, etc. In my research laboratory, most of what I deal with in the arena of my investigations involve integers in the algebraic number fields, which are generalized from standard integers. I am specifically interested in power residue symbols that are generalized from quadratic residue symbols. Furthermore, I am focusing on various finite sums related to the power residue symbols.

Takashi Kimura

Position Professor
Research
Description
I am employing the fundamental concepts of quantum mechanics to conduct a broad range of research on systems where many electrons and atoms exist forming complex relationships. For example, one can break down or shed light on the phenomena that appear to be influenced by the interaction of numerous atoms in a solid, such as in superconductivity which occurs in Maglev. While there are still a lot of things that are unclear in this field, I use both mathematical techniques and computer simulations to try to rationalize existing experiments and to predict new phenomena.

Shinta Kasuya

Position Associate Professor
Research
Description
I would like to solve the question of how the universe is created.
I am especially interested in the beginning and evolution of the early universe, which has a deep connection to particle physics. I study theoretically and/or using numerical simulations the topics of production of the dark matter and baryon asymmetry of the universe, formation of the density perturbations, inflation and the following reheating process, cosmic microwave background radiation, and so on. Observations by the Shonan-Hiratsuka-Campus Telescope are also conducted for the graduation theses.
Homepage Kasuya Laboratory

Kenichi Katoh

Position Associate Professor
Research
Description
Probability models offer a useful approach to mathematically grasping the occurrence of indeterminate phenomena in nature or society. Using analysis, simulations, and other techniques, this approach has a wide variety of possible applications, from familiar problems such as how to shorten the lines waiting for supermarket cash registers to large-scale problems such as designing efficient telecommunications networks. It is expected to help in understanding structures and solving various problems. A particular focus of this laboratory is theoretical analysis of applied probability models using queueing theory and Markov chains.

Ken Kawahigashi

Position Associate Professor
Research
Description
I am conducting a broad range of research in simulations and computational physics, as well as related information science and technology fields, which include: complex system simulations for phenomena that occur in nature and in society, simulations using object-oriented programming language such as Java and C++, and creating frameworks for large scale computing. I am currently developing a framework (class / library) for Java that can create complex system simulations and applications more easily.

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Department of Information Sciences

Tsuneo Kuwabara

Position Professor
Research
Description
I am currently researching information system from the point of view of "computers helping humans."
For example, we have developed an e-learning system which enables even one instructor to support dozens of students individually in real time. I am also investigating new business models using IT and developing a means and tool to evaluate the usability of IT systems. Furthermore, I am investigating more manageable software development methods. I am also applying the cognitive psychology to my research and investigations.
Homepage Kuwabara Laboratory

Takashi Nakayama

Position Professor
Research
Description
We are studying on natural language understanding and developing a dialogue system that converses with a human in Japanese. Specifically, we have been implementing common sense and domain knowledge in the form of a frame network. Question-answering system is one of the typical applications of natural language understanding. For instance, the user could quickly access things on the web, and complicated questions or inquiries could be responded correctly. The key is enabling the dialogue system to learn on its own. We are trying to achieve a flexible dialogue system that can acquire knowledge through web information and conversations.
Homepage Nakayama Laboratory

Leo Nagamatsu

Position Professor
Research
Description
Nowadays, among the information systems that are heavily involved with many of our activities in society, the user's information system must operate without a break. The newest services ideally can be used right away. From the maintenance and management side, they must respond to problem areas quickly and any new functions also require functional architecture so that the user can access them without feeling any inconveniences.
My research aims to establish a configuration method to improve user-friendly information systems for both sides.

Kazuto Matsuo

Position Professor
Research
Description
Information security techniques have become indispensable for privacy protection, secure communications, and user authentication in today's Internet and mobile phone services. This laboratory carries out research on such information security-related themes as methods for implementing encryption algorithms and verifying security. With the main theme of these studies being algebraic curve cryptosystems, notably the elliptic curve encryption seen as the next-generation standard cryptographic technology, a wide range of research themes are taken up including ways of verifying the security of communication technologies in practical use such as Bluetooth.
Homepage Matsuo Laboratory

Haruhiko-Kaiya

Position Professor
Research
Description
An information system demonstrates its worth only when it comes to be used in activities of work or daily life. Even if a system is developed properly with advanced functions and high quality, if it does not match the activities for which it is to be used, that system will be wasteful and only get in the way. The main research themes in this laboratory are requirement analysis, for analyzing what kind of information system is desirable for particular work or life activities, and specification notation, putting the requirement analysis results in a form that can be understood readily by developers. In requirement analysis, a model of real activities is described and a careful examination of the system usefulness is made on this model.

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Department of Chemistry

Yoshio Kabe

Position Professor
Research
Description
Silicon is a basic element in inorganic compounds, and at the same time, it is a congener of carbon, which is a basic element in organic compounds. As a result, silicon forms stable bonds with various elements, in the same way as it does with organic compounds, and an enormous number of “organic silicon compounds” can be synthesized.
In my research laboratory, I synthesized various “organic silicon compounds, including (soccer ball type molecular) fullerene, composed of 60 carbon atoms. I am currently breaking down that unique structure and its reactivity through experiments and theoretical calculations.
Homepage Kabe Laboratory

Nobuhiro Kihara

Position Professor
Research
Description
Creatures like humans have thousands of types of molecules which take specific or required forms within their bodies. We can live because these molecules react appropriately to each other.
My research focuses on organic chemistry that artificially realizes molecular machines or systems whose mechanisms are still not fully understood and highly selective reactions occurring in the body of the creatures.
In addition, from my research in organic synthesis, I have found a new concept called “oxidatively degradable polymer,” which I expect will have numerous applications as a novel type of degradable materials.
Homepage Kihara Laboratory

Kazuo Yamaguchi

Position Professor
Research
Description
My research laboratory synthesizes organic compounds considering the applications for electronics and biotechnology in next generation.
A wide variety of compounds including ionic, low molecular to macromolecular, and also supramolecular, are used in my investigation of highly functional materials. For example, light-sensitive material was developed that changes the properties only in the location where it is exposed to light. This material can be applied for biochips that arrange cells and for thin film transistors used in displays.

Tadashi Sugawara

Position Professor
Research
Description

Creating artificial cells and molecular circuits by combining molecules with unique characteristics

We aim our research at designing unique molecular systems by combining organic molecules so as to understand life phenomena at the molecular level or to create functional materials inspired by biological functions, such as elasticity, educability. For example, we have created artificial cells using vesicles (small bubbles formed from a molecular membrane) with self-reproducing dynamics, and constructed soft molecular circuits into which the desired functions can be programmed.
Homepage Sugawara Laboratory

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Department of Biological Sciences

Susumu Izumi

Position Professor
Research
Description
Insects can be regarded as the most adaptive and flourishing group of organisms in the current global environment.
In my laboratory, I use lepidopteran insects like silkworms as the subjects of an experimental animal, and I analyze a variety of physiological functions in insects by use of molecular and biochemical approaches. In addition, I am planning to analyze the molecular mechanisms to form cilia using transparent nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans.

Kazuhito Inoue

Position Professor
Research
Description
The system of photosynthesis originated in about 2.7 billion years ago. My research interest is focused on evolution of photosynthesis using plants as well as photosynthetic bacteria which leave original features of photosynthesis as a research material. I also pay attention to a biotechnological application of photosynthesis. In addition, with regard to applications, I have an extremely elaborate photosynthesis system, where I am genetically engineering the cyanobacteria, which uses light efficiently. I was able to make improvements and successfully increase the hydrogen production efficiency by ten times or more. Using these research results as a foundation, I am aiming to develop renewable energy sources.

Akiya Hino

Position Professor
Research
Description
For example, at the point of fertilization to a certain stage of early development, we can not realize the difference between sea urchin and human being. However, during the course of development, their forms change respectively; sea urchins embryo become sea urchins, and human embryos become humans. I am investigating how these changes are regulated in the cell, with cell biological and molecular biological sciences. As a material, I am using sea squirts, sea urchins and starfish for specimens in this research. My investigation includes the analysis of morphological changes in the sperm when it fertilizes the egg, and the systematic analysis by mitochondrial DNA etc. In addition, I am also developing academic materials for conducting experiments that make the natural sciences more appealing and attractive for students.
Homepage Hino Laboratory

Haruki Hashimoto

Position Professor
Research
Description
The origin of green plants has been traced to endosymbiosis of cyanobacteria, from which plastids evolved. A basic research theme of this laboratory is the evolution of plant life through endosymbiosis. In order for plastids obtained by endosymbiosis to have passed on their genes to the next generation, it must have been necessary in the evolutionary process to establish mechanisms for plastid division and for cooperation between plastid division and cell division. Research on plastid division is therefore important to the study of both cell biology and evolution theory. This laboratory conducts research, mainly using electron microscopes, on the division of plastids and other plant cell organelles. In the study of biology, there are many structures and phenomena waiting to be seen for the first time in tangible form. The discovery of unknown structures and phenomena within the field of view of an electron microscope brings joy and excitement that can never be forgotten.

Yoshitaka Azumi

Position Associate Professor
Research
Description
The process of cell division is required in order for plants to grow and to produce offspring. During this process, chromosomes that carry genes must be passed on successfully to their daughter cells.
In my laboratory, I am investigating how chromosomes behave and by what mechanism they are successfully segregated during cell division. Especially, I am focusing on meiosis which only occurs once in the life of plants, and is a special type of cell division with no room for error.
Homepage Azumi Laboratory
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