Department of Chemistry

List of Faculty Members,Department of Chemistry

Chikara Amano

Position Professor
Research
Description
My research covers "clusters," small aggregates of atoms or molecules, and "nanoparticles," larger aggregates of nanometers in diameter. Solids or liquids are broken down to form atoms and molecules through clusters and nanoparticles. The research on the structure and character of clusters and nanoparticles makes our knowledge on matter more complete.
Homepage Amano Laboratory

Daisuke Uemura

Position Professor
Research
Description
Organic compounds found in Nature have unique structures that far outshine the imagination of humans. Indeed, for living organisms they function like a sharp edge. My research focuses on natural products that have unique structures and biological activities. I also perform chemical investigations on natural organisms, and, using research tools at the forefront of technology, am striving to understand complex biological phenomena.
In my research, I am inspired to identify pharmaceutical and agrochemical lead compounds, and hope that I will be able to make major contributions to mankind.
Homepage Uemura Laboratory

Yoshio Kabe

Position Professor
Research
Description
Silicon is a basic element in inorganic compounds, and at the same time, it is a congener of carbon, which is a basic element in organic compounds. As a result, silicon forms stable bonds with various elements, in the same way as it does with organic compounds, and an enormous number of “organic silicon compounds” can be synthesized.
In my research laboratory, I synthesized various “organic silicon compounds, including (soccer ball type molecular) fullerene, composed of 60 carbon atoms. I am currently breaking down that unique structure and its reactivity through experiments and theoretical calculations.
Homepage Kabe Laboratory

Tatsuya Kawamoto

Position Professor
Research
Description
My research laboratory focuses on the "complex," a compound that can bind molecules and ions called ligands, to the surrounding metal ions. My specific investigation mostly targets complexes that have extended pi-conjugated systems. Regarding their physical properties and reactivity, I am developing and conducting research on the properties which show interesting features or show unexpected reactions. By trying to develop new compounds, I hope to create a new energy system that is both environmentally-friendly and an alternative to replace fossil fuels.
Homepage Kawamoto Laboratory

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Nobuhiro Kihara

Position Professor
Research
Description
Creatures like humans have thousands of types of molecules which take specific or required forms within their bodies. We can live because these molecules react appropriately to each other.
My research focuses on organic chemistry that artificially realizes molecular machines or systems whose mechanisms are still not fully understood and highly selective reactions occurring in the body of the creatures.
In addition, from my research in organic synthesis, I have found a new concept called “oxidatively degradable polymer,” which I expect will have numerous applications as a novel type of degradable materials.
Homepage Kihara Laboratory

Yuko Nishimoto

Position Professor
Research
Description
Under the slogan "Let's do what we can in 'Analytical Chemistry' to protect our future," I am involved in analyzing the samples or specimens of things that are in close contact with our lives, such as water, air and cultural assets.
With water, for example, I use functional water such as electrolyzed water, which is known to be environmentally-friendly, and I conduct research on the relationship between its function and its components / water structure, and the impact it has on bio-related material. In addition, with regard to deteriorating specimens, I also work with archaeological materials, such as coins that have been excavated.
Homepage Nishimoto Laboratory

Kenji Nomiya

Position Professor
Research
Description
In an effort to design "new complex-based catalysts and antimicrobial active complexes that are environmentally-friendly," my research field is involved in the synthesis in inorganic chemistry, specifically targeting inorganic compounds and metal complexes.
In particular, my research focuses on one project (HPA project) where I perform the "synthesis of molecular inorganic compounds called polyoxometalates, structure analysis and design of catalyst," and on the other project (BIN project) where I perform the "synthesis of antimicrobial active complexes" under main research topic: "antibacterial control using silver and gold metal complexes and the structure-activity relationship."
Homepage Nomiya Laboratory

Yoshinori Hirata

Position Professor
Research
Description
In order to elucidate the mechanism of chemical reactions in the solution phase, my research focuses on the micro-dynamics of the solvents around the reacting molecules, and on the interaction between the solute and solvent molecules. Specifically, by using picosecond laser spectroscopy, I investigate photoionization and photo-induced reactions of aromatic molecules in solution.
Furthermore, to obtain microscopic models of liquid dynamics that are seemingly difficult to be shed a light on through experiments, molecular dynamics simulations are also used to investigate various liquid dynamics.
Homepage Hirata Laboratory

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Hisao Hori

Position Professor
Research
Description
My research is focused on the decomposition and detoxification, and on the technology of recycling for chemical substances that may have negative impact on the environment, while they have high functionality and therefore important not only in industry but also in our lives.
Specifically, I am developing new reaction technologies (subcritical and supercritical water reactions and photochemical reactions) to decompose organofluorine compounds (including fluoropolymers as well) that consist of strong carbon-fluorine bonds, enabling it to be used as a resource again.

Toshiaki Matsubara

Position Professor
Research
Description
By the development of the computer, we are able to easily simulate molecular structures and chemical reactions, by means of theoretical calculations based on basic theories from physics. This is why we are able to understand, on the molecular level, chemical phenomena that is difficult to breakdown in experimental analyses.
In my research laboratory, we examine various natural phenomena, which arise from simple molecules to complex ones, such as biopolymers, using theoretical calculations.

Kazuo Yamaguchi

Position Professor
Research
Description
My research laboratory synthesizes organic compounds considering the applications for electronics and biotechnology in next generation.
A wide variety of compounds including ionic, low molecular to macromolecular, and also supramolecular, are used in my investigation of highly functional materials. For example, light-sensitive material was developed that changes the properties only in the location where it is exposed to light. This material can be applied for biochips that arrange cells and for thin film transistors used in displays.

Tadashi Sugawara

Position Professor
Research
Description

Creating artificial cells and molecular circuits by combining molecules with unique characteristics

We aim our research at designing unique molecular systems by combining organic molecules so as to understand life phenomena at the molecular level or to create functional materials inspired by biological functions, such as elasticity, educability. For example, we have created artificial cells using vesicles (small bubbles formed from a molecular membrane) with self-reproducing dynamics, and constructed soft molecular circuits into which the desired functions can be programmed.
Homepage Sugawara Laboratory

Hayato Tsuji

Position Professor
Research
Description
The main subject of our research group is to develop new organic compounds based on organic synthesis. One of the ultimate goals is to obtain advanced functional materials composed only of ubiquitous elements, such as carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen, avoiding use of rare or toxic elements. For this purpose, we are also interested in constructing new molecular structure by developing new organic reactions making use of the properties of metallic elements. We are also promoting domestic and international joint research projects with scientists in various fields to explore materials science in terms of evaluation of basic properties as well as various applications.
Homepage Tsuji Laboratory
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